Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference and Expo on Dermatopathology and Skin Care Toronto, Canada.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Dr. Hana Zelenkova

Private Clinic of Dermatovenereology, Svidnik, Slovakia

Keynote: Knowledge of the use of fibroblasts and keratinocytes in dermatology
Conference Series Dermatopathology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Hana Zelenkova photo
Biography:

Hana Zelenková has been active in the field of Dermatovenerology since 1973. Since 2000 she has been directing her own Private Clinic of Dermatovenereology. Professional orientation: aesthetic dermatology, acne and facial dermatoses, medicinal mycology (nail diseases), wound management, psoriasis, employment of Ichthyol and carboxytherapy in dermatology. She is a coordinator of many international multicentre trials. More than 555 expert lectures in the Slovak Republic as well as abroad, 440 scientific publications. Co-author of the dermatocosmetic formulae containing Ichthamol and glycyrrhizinic acid. Author of the book “Carboxytherapy” (2015), translated into 4 languages. Regularly invited to deliver lectures at international congresses. Founder and President of the Slovak Society for Aesthetic and Cosmetic Dermatology (SSEDK), organizer and President of the traditional international DERMAPARTY congress. Since 2006 Vice-President European Society of Aesthetic and Cosmetic Dermatology, since 2007 President of the European Society of Aesthetic and Cosmetic Dermatology.

Abstract:

Fibroblasts and keratinocytes represent great and popular therapeutic modalities used in medicine, including dermatology. In this respect, keratinocytes are very important in the treatment of skin defects especially in extensive burns. There are autologous and allogenic skin grafts. The development is heading towards the utilisation of biosynthetic and combined skin grafts that resemble the structure of normal skin –cultivated allogenic and autologous keratinocytes, allogenic or autologous composites, acellular matrices, collagen/hyaluronic acid based matrices, and matrices combining various types of cells (keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts, stem cells). In a successful clinical practice, it is inevitable to establish and maintaingreat cooperation between the physician and an accredited tissue bank or a specialised laboratory. We shall present the usage of fibroblasts in the therapy of a huge pressure ulcer, with great regenerative and rejuvenating effects. Thesuspension of fibroblasts in salinesolutionwas administered in form of intradermal injections. Thenumber of injectionswasdetermined by thenature and size of theproblemarea on the skin. The anti-ageingtreatmentincluded 3 sessions. Theprocedurewasminimum invasive, no allergicreactionswereobserved. Great effects were documented in the usage of dermal and epidermal grafts in the therapy of acute and chronic wounds.

Keynote Forum

Dr. Raphael B. Stricker

Union Square Medical Associates, San Francisco, USA

Keynote: History of Morgellons Disease: From Delusion to Definition
Conference Series Dermatopathology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Raphael B. Stricker photo
Biography:

Dr. Stricker received his medical degree and training in Internal Medicine at Columbia University in New York. He did subspecialty training in Hematology/Oncology at the University of California San Francisco, and supplemental training in Immunology and Immunotherapy at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. He is currently Medical Director of Union Square Medical Associates, a multispecialty practice in San Francisco. Dr. Stricker is a member of the California State Lyme Disease Advisory Committee, and he has testified at Lyme disease hearings before the California State Senate and the United States Congress. He has authored over 200 medical journal articles and abstracts, and he is internationally recognized as a leader in tickborne disease diagnosis, treatment and research.

Abstract:

Morgellons disease (MD) is a skin condition characterized by the presence of multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although the condition may have a longer history, disease matching the above description was first reported in the United States in 2002. Since that time, the condition that we know as MD has become a polemic topic. Because individuals afflicted with the disease may have crawling or stinging sensations and sometimes believe they have an insect or parasite infestation, most medical practitioners consider MD to be a purely delusional disorder. In a literature review, clinical studies supporting the hypothesis that MD is exclusively delusional in origin have considerable methodological flaws and often neglect the fact that mental disorders can result from underlying somatic illness. In contrast, rigorous experimental investigations show that this skin affliction results from a physiological response to the presence of an infectious agent. Recent studies from that point of view show an association between MD and spirochetal infection in humans, cattle and dogs. These investigations have determined that the cutaneous filaments are not implanted textile fibers, but are composed of the cellular proteins keratin and collagen and result from overproduction of these filaments in response to spirochetal infection. Further studies of the genetics, pathogenesis and treatment of MD are warranted.

  • Dermatopathology | Dermatology | Surgical pathology | Immunohistochemistry | Dermatological Diseases | Diagnosis in Dermatopathology | Clinical pathology | Pediatric pathology | Forensic pathology | Inflammatory Dermatopathology | Skin-Toxico Pharmacology | Cosmetic Dermatology | Skin biopsy | Skin Cancer & Mohs Surgery | Cosmetology and Skin Care

Session Introduction

Dr. Anahí Pontón de Katz

Hospital Metropolitano, Quito, Ecuador

Title: 8 years' experience of Mohs micrographic surgery in an Ecuador Center
Speaker
Biography:

Anahí Pontón de Katz is a Dermatologist who completed  a fellowship  in Mohs Micrographic Surgery at Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires in 2010. She were professor of Dermatolgy at the Medicine School of Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador till 2013. She has published 5 papers in reputed journals and has been the autor of a chapter of the book Dermatología en Medicina Interna in 2009.

 

Abstract:

Introduction

The non melanoma skin cancer accounts for 95% of all  skin cancer. Although various treatment modalities are available, the most frequently used option  is surgical excision. Here, we evaluate the efficacy of Mohs micrographic surgery for the treatment of non melanoma skin cancer.

Material and  methods

A retrospective review of all cases of non melanoma carcinoma treated with Mohs micrographic surgery between July 2010 and May 2018 was performed using patient records from Hospital Metropolitano of Quito, the unique Mohs micrographic surgery Center of Ecuador.

Results

A total of 169 non melanoma skin cancer cases treated with Mohs micrographic surgery were identified; 50.5% were in women and 49.5% in men. The mean age of the patients was 70.7 years (range 35 –100 years). The histologic type of the tumor was  basocelular carcinoma in 80.7% of cases and in 97% of cases the tumor was located on the head or neck. Ten percent of the tumors were recurrent following previous treatment. A mean of 1.57 Mohs stages were used, with a mean of  2.05 sections. The mean size of the initial defect was 0.75cm2 and the mean final defect was 2.05cm2. The ratio of  intial tumor size to final defect was estimated at 1.02cm2. Over a mean follow-up of  39 months, there were 2 cases of tumor recurrence (1.1%).

Conclusion

In our experience, Mohs micrographic surgery is effective for the treatment of high-risk non melanoma skin carcinoma.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Abid Hussain MBBS, FCPS (Dermatology) working as consultant dermatologist in Government and Public sector from last 7 years,
He's special interest in clinical dematology, Lasers and Energy Based Devices,  Hair Transplant surgery and teaching in Contemporary medicines in Derma,
He presented his research work in various National and international conferences especially in Dubai derma 2018.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND.

Treatment of acne scars remains a challenge to dermatologists. There exists a multitude of modalities to treat acne scars such as more invasive surgical techniques, subcision, chemical peels, ablative lasers, fractional lasers, etc. with variable results and adverse effects. Fractional radiofrequency microneedle system (FRMS) is a recently used modality to treat acne scars firstly by Korean dermatologists but there is no sufficient trials and studies available worldwide.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the efficacy and adverse effects of fractional radiofrequency microneedle system (FRMS) on acne scars in our population.

METHODS:

Twenty five subjects with acne scars for more than 6 months were enrolled in the study. All patients were treated with fractional radiofrequency microneedle system (Pinxel-2, BEIJING SANHE BEAUTY 2014) on affected areas for a total number of five treatment sessions at         1-month intervals. Subjective assessments were obtained at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months after the last treatment session by self-evaluation, on visual analogue scale and photographic comparison by two independent consultant dermatologists.

RESULTS;

Five patients shows excellent (76 to 100%) improvement, 11 patients good (51 to 75%) improvement, 7 patients moderate (25 to 50%) and 2 patients mild(1 to 25%) improvement.No long term side effects were noted.

CONCLUSION: Radiofrequency Microneedling is safe and effective option for atrophic acne scars.

 

Dr. Nnamdi Sergius Ozor

Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

Title: Review of Malignant Skin Tumors in NNEWI, South-East, Nigeria
Biography:

Dr Ozor, Nnamdi Sergius, was born 39 years ago in Enugu, South-East, Nigeria. He is currently a Specialist Registrar in Histopathology department of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria. He has Bachelor’s degrees of Medicine and Surgery (MB, BS). He also has Bachelor’s degree of Science (B.Sc. in Applied Microbiology) with Masters of Science (M.Sc. in view in Medical Microbiology). He was the pioneer Medical Director of Godfrey Okoye University Health Services, Enugu, Nigeria in 2009. He has submitted five papers for publication in notable journals.

 

 

Abstract:

 BACKGROUND: Skin malignancy rank among the most common malignancies involving both sexes. Basal cell carcinoma is reported as the commonest malignancy even though studies have implicated Squamous cell carcinoma as the commonest especially in the tropic regions of the world.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aims at determining the frequency and patterns of malignant skin tumors in Nnewi, Nigeria.

METHODOLOGY: This is a retrospective study from 2008 to 2017 (10 years) of histologic slides and records belonging to patients presenting to this hospital.

RESULTS: A total of 312 skin biopsies were received in the Histopathology department during the study period. Out of these, 77 cases were malignant skin lesions (24.7%). The commonest skin malignancy was Squamous cell carcinoma, accounting for (n=34; 44.2%). Melanoma constituted the second majority of the cases (n=21; 27.3%). This is closely followed by basal cell carcinoma, accounting for (n=20; 26.0%). Other malignant skin tumors seen are: Malignant acrospiroma (n=1; 1.3%) and Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (n=1; 1.3%).

It was also discovered that 47 (61%) out of 77 malignant cases were males, while 30 (39%) of them were females, therefore the male: female is 2:1.3.

The mean age of those with malignant skin tumors is 59.4 years. It was observed that patients of ≥60 years constitute 48.1% while patients <30years of age constitute 5.6% of those with malignant skin tumors.

CONCLUSION: The frequencies of different morphological pattern is different from those reported in western countries. However, it is similar to a work done in a Midwestern Nigeria tertiary hospital.

 

Dr. Endris Alkadir Semman

Bahir Dar University School of Medicine and health science, Ethiopia

Title: Adult hemangioma over the lip with frequent ulceration and literature review
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Endris Alkadir Semman graduated from university of Gondar as a medical doctor at the age of 25 in 2011G.C. And then his postgraduate study from Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia as a general surgeon in 2016 G.C. Currently he is working as a surgeon and mentor at Felegehiwot comprehensive specialized Hospital and Bahir Dar University respectively.

 

Abstract:

Hemangiomas are benign tumors of vascular endothelium. They are the most common tumors of childhood occurring in up to 10 percent of Caucasian infants. Despite their benign and self-limited nature, some hemangiomas can cause complications such as ulceration or life-altering disfigurement. Occasionally, it may compromise vital organ function or may occur in association with developmental anomalies. Infantile hemangiomas are characterized by a proliferative phase and an involution phase. In contrast, vascular malformations, which are structural anomalies derived from capillaries, arteries, veins, lymphatics, or a combination thereof, grow in proportion to the child but generally do not regress. Hemangiomas are characterized by phases of proliferation and involution as defined by a rapid proliferation of blood vessels in the first year of life, followed by gradual regression of the vascular component with replacement by fibrofatty tissue. Completed involution occurs at an estimated minimum rate of 10 percent per year, so approximately 90 percent regress by age nine. However, the rate of involution is highly variable.

Here I present a case of deep or subcutaneous hemangioma of the upper lip in a 42 years old male patient after he presented with upper lip swelling since childhood. As the patient describes, the swelling was growing slowly and doesnot regress despite he was on systemic and local steroid treatment for long time. The lesion frequently bleeds as it ulcerates with minor traumas and heals leaving a scar over it. Because of the disfigurement, he used to cover his mouth and could not get married. On physical examination, there was 5cm by 6cm soft, compressible, non tender mass hunging from the upper lip with overlyng scar. No other site swelling, no organomegally. Diagnosis was made by clinical exam and FNAC. Abdominal CT scan was done and found to be normal. For the patient’s cosmetic concern, we prepare him for operation. We secure the airway, decompress it slowly, and then excise the honeycomb like capillary network together with the redundant skin, mucosa and fibrofatty tissue. Hemostasis secured, and the atrophied orbicularis oris muscle and skin were refashioned. He was followed for five days in the hospital and discharged improved. He was seen at referral clinic repeatedly for about six months and no recurrence. Details of the pathology, diagnosis and management will be discussed.

 

Jeung-Hoon Lee

Chungnam National University, Daejeon, Korea

Title: Prurigo pigmentosa after a low-carbohydrate diet
Biography:

Jeung-Hoon Lee, MD has Chairman of Board of Directors, Korean Society for Investigative Dermatology. Director, Research Institute for Medical Science, Chungnam National University.

Abstract:

Prurigo pigmentosa (PP) is a severe pruritic skin disease in young adults with recurrent eruptions of pruritic erythematous macules and papules.  The etiology of prurigo pigmentosa is not well known but many studies have focused on dietary modification and ketosis. A 24-year-old female presented with pruritic erythematous plaques on her upper chest which appeared since 2 months ago. The patient undertook a low-carbohydrate high-fat diet one month before the eruption of the skin lesions. Histopathological examination showed intracorneal microabscess, necrotic keratinocytes, exocytosis with spongiosis, vacuolar degeneration of basal cells, and superficial perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration with neutrophils. The rash improved significantly with diet modification and oral minocycline medication. Here, we report a case of prurigo pigmentosa associated with a low-carbohydrate diet.

 

Dr. Hana Zelenkova

Private Clinic of Dermatovenereology, Svidnik, Slovakia

Title: Knowledge of the use of fibroblasts and keratinocytes in dermatology
Speaker
Biography:

Hana Zelenková has been active in the field of Dermatovenerology since 1973. Since 2000 she has been directing her own Private Clinic of Dermatovenereology. Professional orientation: aesthetic dermatology, acne and facial dermatoses, medicinal mycology (nail diseases), wound management, psoriasis, employment of Ichthyol and carboxytherapy in dermatology. She is a coordinator of many international multicentre trials. More than 555 expert lectures in the Slovak Republic as well as abroad, 440 scientific publications. Co-author of the dermatocosmetic formulae containing Ichthamol and glycyrrhizinic acid. Author of the book “Carboxytherapy” (2015), translated into 4 languages. Regularly invited to deliver lectures at international congresses. Founder and President of the Slovak Society for Aesthetic and Cosmetic Dermatology (SSEDK), organizer and President of the traditional international DERMAPARTY congress. Since 2006 Vice-President European Society of Aesthetic and Cosmetic Dermatology, since 2007 President of the European Society of Aesthetic and Cosmetic Dermatology.

 

Abstract:

Fibroblasts and keratinocytes represent great and popular therapeutic modalities used in medicine, including dermatology. In this respect, keratinocytes are very important in the treatment of skin defects especially in extensive burns. There are autologous and allogenic skin grafts. The development is heading towards the utilisation of biosynthetic and combined skin grafts that resemble the structure of normal skin –cultivated allogenic and autologous keratinocytes, allogenic or autologous composites, acellular matrices, collagen/hyaluronic acid based matrices, and matrices combining various types of cells (keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts, stem cells). In a successful clinical practice, it is inevitable to establish and maintaingreat cooperation between the physician and an accredited tissue bank or a specialised laboratory. We shall present the usage of fibroblasts in the therapy of a huge pressure ulcer, with great regenerative and rejuvenating effects. Thesuspension of fibroblasts in salinesolutionwas administered in form of intradermal injections. Thenumber of injectionswasdetermined by thenature and size of theproblemarea on the skin. The anti-ageingtreatmentincluded 3 sessions. Theprocedurewasminimum invasive, no allergicreactionswereobserved. Great effects were documented in the usage of dermal and epidermal grafts in the therapy of acute and chronic wounds.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Hana Zelenková has been active in the field of Dermatovenerology since 1973. Since 2000 she has been directing her own Private Clinic of Dermatovenereology. Professional orientation: aesthetic dermatology, acne and facial dermatoses, medicinal mycology (nail diseases), wound management, psoriasis, employment of Ichthyol and carboxytherapy in dermatology. She is a coordinator of many international multicentre trials. More than 555 expert lectures in the Slovak Republic as well as abroad, 440 scientific publications. Co-author of the dermatocosmetic formulae containing Ichthamol and glycyrrhizinic acid. Author of the book “Carboxytherapy” (2015), translated into 4 languages. Regularly invited to deliver lectures at international congresses. Founder and President of the Slovak Society for Aesthetic and Cosmetic Dermatology (SSEDK), organizer and President of the traditional international DERMAPARTY congress. Since 2006 Vice-President European Society of Aesthetic and Cosmetic Dermatology, since 2007 President of the European Society of Aesthetic and Cosmetic Dermatology.

 

Abstract:

The utilisation of carbon dioxide in medicine and balneotherapy has seen a long-year development. At the beginning the utilisation was purely empirical, but gradually a solid scientific basis was formed. Carboxytherapy – therapeutically applied carbon dioxide injections have been used in balneotherapy since 1932. In the last four  years however, this treatment modality has become the centre of attention as a unique method applicable in dermatology, aesthetic dermatology and anti-aging medicine.Many renowned clinics of aesthetic medicine promote this unique method as minimum invasive and non-aggressive, comfortable for the patient and producing excellent effects without the risk of undesired side effects. Nowadays, this method is very popular and used in various offices around the globe.  In aesthetic dermatology this method may be applied as a rejuvenation modality and is employed mainly due to its classic vasodilatation effect and its capacity to foster intradermal collagen restructuring. In classic dermatology it is used to treat patients with poor healing lower leg ulcers, in diabetic patients and in patients with poor healing surgical wounds. Carboxytherapy is efficient also in some psoriasis manifestations when combined with some other traditional approaches, in circumscript scleroderma, lichen verrucosus as well as hair loss. In aesthetic dermatology the effect is manifestquite soon (usually after two sessions already in the course of 7-14 days). It significantly and visibly improves the tonus of the skin as well as other aesthetic parameters (especially while treating skin laxity in abdomen area, inner arms and thighs, and double chin or saggy eyelids. Good effects also show following the application of carboxytherapy to treat stretch marks, cellulite, and scars (also older and more extensive scars after burns). Great effects are achieved in correcting the side effects of ill performed interventions such as liposuction, or in using carboxytherapy directly to shape problem body areas (thighs, hips and abdomen). The presentation demonstrated great therapeutic effects achieved in  aesthetic dermatology and alopecia totalis,  alopecia areata, keloids,striae cutis distensae, andrologia – erectile dysfunction  and other  various diagnoses.

 

Ibrahim Khalifeh

American University of Beirut Medical Center,Beirut

Title: The Epidemic of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis among Syrian Refugees in Lebanon
Speaker
Biography:

After earning his MD from Damascus Medical School in 1999, Dr. Ibrahim Khalifeh completed a surgery internship (2000-2001) and pathology residency (2001-2002) at American University of Beirut Medical Center. In 2002, he left for the USA where he did four years of training in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Wayne State University in Detroit (2002-2006), Oncologic Pathology and Cytopathology fellowships at MD Anderson Cancer Center (2006-2008) then he joined the University of Alabama where he completed one year of fellowship in Dermatopathology (2008-2009). Dr. Khalifeh is a diplomat of the American Board of Anatomic and Clinical Pathology, Cytopathology and Dermatopathology. He joined the Department of Pathology and Laboratory medicine at AUBMC in 2009 as assistant professor.  He has been involved in multiple projects related to cutaneous leishmania, melanoma, dysplastic nevi and BRAF.
 

Abstract:

Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), a potentially chronic and disfiguring condition, has been thrust in to the spotlight following reports among military personnel returning from the Near East. Lebanon (LB), a non-endemic area, is now suffering a health care crisis in the wake of a CL epidemic brought from endemic Syria by the protracted conflict in the region, resulting in the displacement of over 1,500,000 refugees into LB.

Materials and Methods: Punch biopsies (1 patient sampled/displaced family, n=158) were taken for histologic examination (parasitic index) and molecular speciation by PCR. Demographics, migration patterns, lesion number and characteristics including presence of extensive disease (ED) were documented. ED was defined as having ≥1 of the following: Disfiguring, threatening the function of vital sensory organs, lesion present for >12 months, >3cm, ≥5 lesions and special forms of CL (i.e. sporotrichoid).

Results: 1275 refugees with CL fled from endemic and non-endemic areas alike, had been in LB 5 months on average and 77% of them reported the appearance of the first lesion after being in LB for > 2 months (average incubation period 2-8 weeks). Of the 158 sampled patients, PCR resulted in 135 cases of L. tropica and 23 L. major types. In this special conflict population, the preponderance of patients sampled were under 18 years old (80%) and an average of 52% members were affected/family (mean number of members = 6). The majority of patients met criteria for ED (59%) including: 27.3% with disease compromising a sensory organ, 9% special forms, 37.3% disfiguring, 49% >3cm, 20% > 5 lesions and 9% chronic lesions. Parasitic index, molecular subtype and geographic location were similar for ED versus non-ED. ED was more prevalent among children (median 9 vs. 21 years; p=0.002) and was more frequently observed on the face and lower extremities (p=0.002). Both age and anatomic location were predictors of ED by multivariate logistic regression. 82% of the cases had initial cure after treatment.

Conclusion: In studying this epidemic, we are seeing a new face of CL in times of war; stressful and unsanitary living conditions may account for the uncharacteristically high number patients with ED. Furthermore, the majority of patients reported appearance of lesions well beyond average documented incubation periods for CL suggesting the transfer and propagation of CL to LB and other non-endemic countries harboring refugees.

 

Speaker
Biography:

After earning his MD from Damascus Medical School in 1999, Dr. Ibrahim Khalifeh completed a surgery internship (2000-2001) and pathology residency (2001-2002) at American University of Beirut Medical Center. In 2002, he left for the USA where he did four years of training in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Wayne State University in Detroit (2002-2006), Oncologic Pathology and Cytopathology fellowships at MD Anderson Cancer Center (2006-2008) then he joined the University of Alabama where he completed one year of fellowship in Dermatopathology (2008-2009). Dr. Khalifeh is a diplomat of the American Board of Anatomic and Clinical Pathology, Cytopathology and Dermatopathology. He joined the Department of Pathology and Laboratory medicine at AUBMC in 2009 as assistant professor.  He has been involved in multiple projects related to cutaneous leishmania, melanoma, dysplastic nevi and BRAF.

Abstract:

Background: BRAF mutation has been linked to the development of melanocytic tumors in homogeneous Caucasian cohorts. The role of solar UV radiation (UVR) in BRAF mutation status is poorly understood. We studied the epidemiology of BRAF mutation across a spectrum of melanocytic neoplasms in populations with differing UVR rates.

Design: Extended testing for 9 mutation types was attempted in 600 melanocytic neoplasms including banal nevi (n=225), dysplastic nevi (n=113), primary (n=172) and metastatic melanomas (n=90). Specimens were collected from 4 countries with increasing UVR rates (kJ/m2/yr): Syria (N=45; UVR=93.5), Lebanon (N=225; UVR=110), Pakistan (N=122; UVR=128) and Saudi Arabia (N=208; UVR=139). UVR was estimated as 21-year averages from The National Center for Atmospheric Research database.

Results: Overall BRAF mutation rate was 49% (268/545) and differed significantly by geographic location [34 % Pakistan, 49% Lebanon, 67% Syria and 54% Saudi Arabia (  =0.001)], neoplasm type (  <0.001) and anatomic location (  <0.001) but not with age (  =0.07) and gender ( =1.0).  V600E was the predominant type in 96.3% of the cases. Incidence of melanoma was significantly greater in BRAF negative (77.6%) vs. BRAF positive (27.6%) groups. For BRAF positive, less severe lesions were systematically more frequent ( P <0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that BRAF mutation is predicted by neoplasm type, anatomic and geographic locations.

Conclusion: In our Near East cohort, BRAF mutation rates varied by geographic location but not based on UVR. BRAF positive status was associated with less severe lesions.

 

 

Ying Guo

Ackerman Academy of Dermatopathology, New York, USA

Title: Melanoma Mimickers: Diagnostic Pitfalls
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ying Guo is a dermatopathologist, and currently serves as the medical director at Ackerman Academy of Dermatopathology, New York City. Dr. Guo graduated from China Medical University and finished her Dermatology training in China Medical University Hospital, and Pathology training in Jefferson University Hospital where she also did her fellowship in Dermatopathology directed by Dr. A. Bernard Ackerman. Dr. Guo had been working at Ackerman Academy of Dermatopathology since it was founded.  She has been diagnosing dermpath cases, teaching fellows and residents, and has published over 60 papers, and as a co-author, 7 text books in the field.

 

Abstract:

Melanoma, a malignant neoplasm of melanocytes, is the most aggressive and life-threatening skin tumor. The incidence of melanoma has been rising in the past few decades, and melanoma still leads to >90% of skin cancer death. Because of its phenotypic diversity, making an accurate diagnosis could be challenging both clinically and histopathologically.  Histopathology still remains the gold standard for the diagnosis. However, there are mimickers that may range from reactive to neoplastic processes and may be from multiple histogenetic lines. Misdiagnosis as a melanoma is more likely to occur when a lesion is pigmented, and histopathologically less differentiated. Over diagnosis or under diagnosis will significantly affect the patients care. Careful routine histologic examination in conjunction with immunohistochemical study is essential in order to make accurate diagnosis or exclude the diagnosis of melanoma.  This presentation would be helpful to identify melanoma mimickers and to avoid the diagnostic confusion.

 

Ashley Ann Lora

Dupixent Advocate in Los Angeles, CA, USA

Title: How Dupixent Has Changed My Life and the Eczema Community
Speaker
Biography:

Ashley graduated magna cum laude from Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles) with a degree in Sociology and Urban Studies. She has suffered from atopic dermatitis for 26 years and considers herself a survivor of topical steroids withdrawal (TSW). Ashley was one of the 2100+ participants in Dupixent’s clinical trials and has been on Dupixent since 2015. She was featured on the cover of Health Monitor magazine, and has participated in multiple interviews with different skin blogs regarding her journey. Her knowledge with eczema, asthma, TSW and Dupixent has led her to become a major influence in the eczema community.

 

 

Abstract:

Dupixent is the first biological therapy approved by the FDA for adults suffering from moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (eczema).  This new leading medication targets specific parts of the immune system that contributes to the inflammation found in many inflammatory conditions. Its biological component and healing from “within” makes this injectable prescription medicine unique from other topical treatments like topical corticosteroids and immunosuppressant drugs. Studies of over 2100+ participants in Dupixent’s clinical trials have shown results in clearer skin and significant reduction in itching. Ashley Lora was fortunate to be one of those participants and has experienced undeniable healing. With over 26 years of experience with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, 15 years with asthma, and over 2 years of topical steroids withdrawal, Ashley is approximately 90% healed. Ashley’s experience with Dupixent since 2015 has given her an advantage in supporting others who need hope and are interested in Dupixent. Through her constant interaction with the eczema community, Ashley has compiled feedback from those currently on Dupixent. This will give others a better understanding from the patient perspective on what’s working and what is ineffective when it comes to this new therapy.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Flavia Laffleur, is an assistant prfoessorand a senior researcher of Drug Delivery in the Department of Pharmacy at LFU Innsbruck, Austria. Flavia Laffleur published over 68 publications and gave oral presentations on several international conferences. From 2010 until 2013 she completed her doctoral thesis focused on smart drug delivery systems. Since 2013, she is a senior researcher at the Department of Pharmaceutical Technology in Innsbruck. Since 2017, Dr. Flavia Laffleur is a researcher at the MIT, in Boston, Massachusetts. She received several awards, including Lesmüller-Stiftung award and the Galenus Foundation Technology Award. Currently Dr. Laffleur´s research focusses on mucosal drug delivery as well as smart delivery systems to overcome biological barriers.

Abstract:

Predominantly, the majority of fungal infections (dermal and nail) are caused by dermatophytes, such as Trichophyton rubrum known as one of the most prominent . Among fungal infections, nail infections or onychomycosis exhibit the most difficulties and limitations in their treatment. Onychomycosis affects around 5-10% of the population in the world. Onychomycosis is a common infection of the nail caused by dermatophyte affecting mostly toenails in adults being associated with limited treatment options. In this study novel dosage forms were prepared and evaluated for their suitability in treatment of onychomycosis. Films were prepared comprising polymeric excipients such as chitosan, (hydroxypropyl)methyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl-cellulose, carboxymethylcellulose according to solvent evaporation method. Developed formulations were evaluated in terms of physical appearance, stability and adhesiveness. Furthermore skin and nail irritation studies were conducted. Five potential formulations (F1-F5) were designed while F1 and F4 exhibited the most promising results in terms of stability with 26 min and 40.67 min, respectively, and suitability in nail application. F1 as the most favorable dosage form revealed with 2.9438 kg/m/s in terms of adhesive force the most adhesive properties in contrast to the other preparations. All formulations were found to be non-skin irritating and safe to use. Taken together, these findings suggest novel designed films containing polymeric excipients as a fruitful platform for the treatment in onychomycosis.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Nwoba Victor Ronald holds a Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science (BMLS) from Ebonyi State University and also a Postgraduate Student of the same University. He is engaged in the Department of Histopathology Federal Medical Centre Bida, Niger State and also has a special interest in gynecological cytology.

 

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: In the tropics, skin disease easily spread since there are more tendencies to communal lives in the developing tropical countries. This constitutes a serious challenge to their health systems. Dermatoses are predominantly seen.

DIAGNOSTICS: Dermatopathology plays a significant role in diagnosing these skin diseases such as fungal infection, leprosy, leishmaniasis etc.

Dermatopathology in its analysis presents a differential diagnosis of infectious and non infectious inflammatory disease of the skin.

CONCLUSION: It is always difficult to perform dermatopathologic analysis of people in the public places (mosques, churches and market) for religious reasons since people who are at these places could be noncompliant. Therefore, there should be better awareness campaign to enlighten the public, development of standard laboratories and training of more drematopathologist to face these challenges.

 

Raphael B. Stricker

Union Square Medical Associates, San Francisco, USA

Title: History of Morgellons Disease: From Delusion to Definition
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Stricker received his medical degree and training in Internal Medicine at Columbia University in New York. He did subspecialty training in Hematology/Oncology at the University of California San Francisco, and supplemental training in Immunology and Immunotherapy at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. He is currently Medical Director of Union Square Medical Associates, a multispecialty practice in San Francisco. Dr. Stricker is a member of the California State Lyme Disease Advisory Committee, and he has testified at Lyme disease hearings before the California State Senate and the United States Congress. He has authored over 200 medical journal articles and abstracts, and he is internationally recognized as a leader in tickborne disease diagnosis, treatment and research.

Abstract:

Morgellons disease (MD) is a skin condition characterized by the presence of multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although the condition may have a longer history, disease matching the above description was first reported in the United States in 2002. Since that time, the condition that we know as MD has become a polemic topic. Because individuals afflicted with the disease may have crawling or stinging sensations and sometimes believe they have an insect or parasite infestation, most medical practitioners consider MD to be a purely delusional disorder. In a literature review, clinical studies supporting the hypothesis that MD is exclusively delusional in origin have considerable methodological flaws and often neglect the fact that mental disorders can result from underlying somatic illness. In contrast, rigorous experimental investigations show that this skin affliction results from a physiological response to the presence of an infectious agent. Recent studies from that point of view show an association between MD and spirochetal infection in humans, cattle and dogs. These investigations have determined that the cutaneous filaments are not implanted textile fibers, but are composed of the cellular proteins keratin and collagen and result from overproduction of these filaments in response to spirochetal infection. Further studies of the genetics, pathogenesis and treatment of MD are warranted.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Manu Jain is an Assistant Attending and an optical imaging specialist in the Department of Dermatology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She is a trained pathologist and has over 8 years experiencein optical imaging techniques, including reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), multiphoton microscopy (MPM), full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT), and 7-Tesla MRI for making bedside diagnosis in real-time in patients and evaluating ex vivo tissues for tumor margin assessment during Mohs surgery. She has published extensively in this field in reputed journals and has been an invited speaker for many national and international meetings.

 

Abstract:

The diagnosis of skin cancer relies on visual inspection and dermoscopy, often followed by biopsy of the suspicious lesion for histopathological confirmation. Although biopsy and histopathological examination is the gold standard for a definitive diagnosis, biopsy is an invasive procedure associated with complications such as bleeding, pain, infection, and scarring. Biopsy is especially un-desirable forpatients with multiple skin cancers, and for lesions located in cosmetically sensitive regions of the face. Histopathology on the otherhand cannot render an immediate bedside diagnosis as it requires time-consuming tissue processing, often delaying diagnosis and management of the skin lesions. To overcome the existing diagnostic challenges, several non-invasive imaging technologies have emerged in recent years that can image skin at “near-histological” resolution without performing a biopsy called “optical imaging techniques”, including techniques such as reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), optical coherence tomography (OCT), multi/hyperspectral imaging, Raman microscopy/spectroscopy, photoacoustic tomography, and multiphoton microscopy (MPM). These techniques are primarily used for non-invasive diagnosis of skin lesions in vivo in real-time to reduce unnecessary biopsies and associated complications. They are also being used to non-invasively monitor skin lesions and post-treatment clearance and/or recurrence of cancer over a period of time.Not only these optical imaging techniques can be used in vivo but they are also being used for rapidly evaluatingex vivo tissue for intra-operative margin assessment of tumors during Mohs surgery.